Author Topic: Pricing  (Read 1664 times)

Tinker

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Pricing
« on: March 31, 2015, 08:44:11 AM »
I knew eventually someone would want to buy something and was dreading the pricing conversation - and now the time has come!! Someone wants to commission a tile like my house pic. Its 6x6 and obviously I can price the inclusions and decals but how do I price the rest? Whats a reasonable price for something like that? I have researched coasters and they are 5-6 so would you say 15-20? Out of my depth here!!

Blue Box Studio

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Re: Pricing
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2015, 09:23:28 AM »
What's your hourly rate and how long will it take you?  You need to add on your overheads pro-rata (tax, NI, insurance, electricity, kiln replacement etc - mine work out 2.20 an hour before I even open the door!) before you add in your costs and then your profit margin.  It is also bespoke so I would think 20 minimum.  There are spreadsheets out there for working all this out, bought mine from someone on Etsy and I use it to run all new products through before I commit to anything.
Sue ~ Blue Box Studio ~ see website for outlets
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Tinker

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Re: Pricing
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2015, 09:35:31 AM »
Ok thanks Sue. Put like that it sounds less daunting!

Dawn

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Re: Pricing
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2015, 05:28:34 PM »
I have researched coasters and they are 5-6 so would you say 15-20? Out of my depth here!!

When I see coasters priced at that, I get frustrated.  Assuming coloured Bullseye, you're really looking about 2 worth of glass before you start.  Then there's cleaning, preparing, loading and unloading kiln, firing costs, bumpers, packaging and wrapping, oh and all those overheads that Sue mentioned.

If I sold my coasters at 5 each through a gallery, I'd only be covering materials, no making time or costs at all.  I list coasters at 10 each or usually 36 for a set of four, I do sell them cheaper to clear out, but I've sold plenty through the gallery that stocks my coasters.

Jo Downs coasters are the same price range, I am not sure if her's are 9cm square as opposed to 10cm, and I am pretty sure they're not Bullseye; they look like window glass with inclusions.  With the quantity she produces, if they can't do them at any less, then I reckon that's a decent ball park figure.

My 15cm dishes, which are fairly plain, retail at 25, of course that's two processes in the kiln, fusing and slumping, but less detailing in the making.

Do not undersell yourself!!

Tinker

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Re: Pricing
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2015, 05:44:26 PM »
Hmmm, ok - thanks Dawn! You have a very good point there.

jille

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Re: Pricing
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2015, 07:02:40 PM »
I agree with you Dawn about coasters in bullseye, and I was going to mention you should add a mark up now because if you start making for a gallery one day you will have to increase your prices by quite a lot.
I keep my prices the same as I don't feel its fair on the gallery to undercut them by selling direct. I've heard makers at a pop up gallery telling customers to go to their website to buy cheaper, but will they get invited back. Anyway I'm digressing here.
Don't sell yourself short just because you are new to fusing, if its a nice piece it's a nice piece and worth the money

Dawn

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Re: Pricing
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2015, 08:39:12 PM »
I agree with you Dawn about coasters in bullseye, and I was going to mention you should add a mark up now because if you start making for a gallery one day you will have to increase your prices by quite a lot.
I keep my prices the same as I don't feel its fair on the gallery to undercut them by selling direct. I've heard makers at a pop up gallery telling customers to go to their website to buy cheaper, but will they get invited back. Anyway I'm digressing here.


Totally agree here, thankfully we had a good drilling on the subject at uni so, apart from a few pendants when I first started that I sold at a fair before I became 'public' I started out at gallery prices.  Whilst you take a hit on selling through a gallery, the time you *don't* spend at craft fairs, setting up, sitting there doing nothing for two days, when you could be making, etc. could well be worth it.  And again, as Jill says, I don't undercut my galleries on line (unless clearance/special sale) as I want them to keep representing me. 

Telling customers at a gallery that they can get cheaper is a big no-no IMHO, when you think about what the overheads must be and a decent gallery works hard to sell, it probably isn't such a bad deal after all.




Terri

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Re: Pricing
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2015, 11:24:19 AM »
What they said - never, ever undercut your galleries.  Price as if a gallery is selling it.  Have a look round a few galleries to see what they are asking.  Market value is often higher than costs plus a % of profit.  Consequently, sometimes you can make a shed ore mo ey on somethings that balances out the slimmer margins on others.  ;)