Author Topic: Hobby Ceramicraft Studio 1 kiln for glass fusing?  (Read 3110 times)

FionaS

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Hobby Ceramicraft Studio 1 kiln for glass fusing?
« on: July 03, 2014, 03:12:09 PM »
I'm thinking of buying a larger kiln for fused glass and was wondering if anyone had used one of these. I know they're sold as ceramic kilns rather than glass kilns and was only drawn to it for the depth as it would be nice to make vases as well as flat/shallow things.

My knowledge on fusing glass is pretty limited to making a coaster and kilns confuse me as people talk about hot and cold spots and things not fusing properly depending on where in the kiln it's placed so I've always thought it would be better to have a shallower kiln for coasters, plates, etc and having a different deeper (and possibly front loader) kiln for vases.  But is this the case? Would a top loader as deep as the Studio 1 (22.25" / 56.5cm) be awkward to use?

I'm looking at second hand kilns and this one came up which is why I'm now questioning whether it would be any good.  I was also looking at a Paragon Fusion 10 Kiln currently for sale.  Do any of you have this one?  Would I be better off with something like that?

Any advice on what you have and the pros and cons of it would be welcome as I'm starting to confuse myself on what would be best for me.  All I know for definite is that I need/want larger as only being able to make one coaster at a time is driving me nuts.  ;D

jille

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Re: Hobby Ceramicraft Studio 1 kiln for glass fusing?
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2014, 05:50:08 PM »
I've always used ceramic kilns for my glass, i can fire 3 shelves (batts) without any problems.   

Dawn

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Re: Hobby Ceramicraft Studio 1 kiln for glass fusing?
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2014, 06:27:46 PM »
There are, generally, two main differences between a glass kiln and a ceramics kiln.

The first is the controller - a lot of controllers designed for ceramics kilns only have perhaps 3 segments, which might be two ramps and one hold - and not the controlled cool down required for glass.  That said, most ceramics kilns are so well insulated that the cool down is slow enough to cover the annealing bit anyway.

You will also find that as a general, but not absolute - most glass kilns are top firing, and most ceramics kilns are side firing.  This is because glass fusing will often only be done on a single layer, so you will get a more even fuse with a top element.

However, you can and do use ceramics kilns for firing, I cut my teeth fusing for the first two years using only ceramics kilns, and yes, with a lot of kilns you will get a variance in temperature from top to bottom - heat rises after all!   I used it to my benefit though, on the big one we had at college, that was about waist high, you could fuse Bullseye perfectly on the bottom shelf and still fuse float glass fully on the top zone, so I could fire two different types of glass in one firing, instead of two, which I have to do now if I want them both full fusing.

I found I had to be more careful about what was placed at the outer edges of the shelves, and how close they were to the side elements - and if I had inclusions, I always placed them towards the middle of the kiln to avoid the edges sealing too quickly, etc.

It still comes down the the basics of getting to know your kiln though, no matter what.

If I could afford a couple of kilns, I would probably have a ceramics kiln for deeper stuff as yes, glass kilns are a bit shallow and limiting - but you also have to consider how you'd go about making vases anyway.  The faff of drop-outs doesn't appeal a great deal to me, so I'd only be doing handkerchief vases anyway I guess...


FionaS

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Re: Hobby Ceramicraft Studio 1 kiln for glass fusing?
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2014, 05:35:06 PM »
Thanks for the info.  Although I have read about it before my head wasn't registering about the glass kilns top firing and also I didn't think about how the controller would work although on the ceramic kiln I mentioned it looks like a good controller.

I'm thinking now that perhaps it would be better for me to get a glass kiln as like you Dawn I'd only want to make handkerchief vases and I've still got a lot to learn about fusing so not worrying about side elements would probably be beneficial to me.

Right got to go and find one now whilst the hubby is still partly agreeing to me getting one instead of being dead against it like he normally is.  ;D

Dawn

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Re: Hobby Ceramicraft Studio 1 kiln for glass fusing?
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2014, 06:00:48 PM »
I don't know what the prices are like, but Rohde kilns do a range of kilns that are the typical ceramic cylinder shape and a bit deeper, but that a glass firing controller as one of their options.

To be honest, the majority of dedicated glass kilns would only allow a handkerchief vase of about 5 inches deep/tall (?) - if you wanted to go taller, you'd need to think of a deeper kiln -then again, you also would have to think of the overall diameter (if you are confused, just think about the measurements - you might only want a vase 10 inches tall, but it's one piece of glass so that is 10inches + 10inches (two sides) plus a few for the base - so you may only need a 12 inch deep kiln but it would need to be something like 25 inches across.... actually I have never though of it like that before!


FionaS

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Re: Hobby Ceramicraft Studio 1 kiln for glass fusing?
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2014, 09:20:28 PM »
Good thinking, I hadn't thought of it like that either. I'd be able to make a taller vase in the glass kiln I mentioned than the ceramic one. Thanks for pointing that out Dawn.  ;D. I've never heard of Rohde kilns before. I shall have a look. 

jille

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Re: Hobby Ceramicraft Studio 1 kiln for glass fusing?
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2014, 05:25:30 PM »
My Northern Kilns ceramics kiln has a great controller, i can heat at 2 rates, hold, anneal , hold, and cool at 2 different rates, so it has at least 5 segments

LauraS

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Re: Hobby Ceramicraft Studio 1 kiln for glass fusing?
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2015, 12:56:34 PM »
The Studio 1 kiln is probably deeper than you would need. It's a fair size kiln. I have a Firelux from Hobby Ceramicraft, which I use primarily for my ceramics but also use for pot melts. I would give Jane, at HC, a ring. She's very helpful and knows a lot about glass and would point you in the right direction.