Author Topic: What Camera?  (Read 2054 times)

Ilona

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What Camera?
« on: April 27, 2014, 09:56:22 AM »
I am back to not being happy with my camera's. I love my DSLR, but need a closer lens and don't want to pay ::) I love it for other pics not my bead ones. I have a point and shoot Olympus MU820 and it is OK, but I have been using a camera at work for some close up pics and it is amazing. I do think cameras have improved so much, and would love to know what you are all using and what they cost.

tomcat

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Re: What Camera?
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2014, 12:43:03 PM »
I havea Pentax KR, out of production now, its a great camera main reason for it was I have always used Pentax and my PKA lenses - my much loved 20 year old Macro lens fits the Pentax DSLR  ;D Its not so much the camera as the lens that counts to be honest - if you are looking at the big names they are all good with little to chose betweren them

You can get closeup filters to go on the end of a lens to give you close up shots on a standar lens, not too expensive, or extension tubes that go between the body and the lense that give you macro on a standard lens - more expensive if you want to keep the auto functions though but still a lot cheaper than a good macro lens

tomcat

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Re: What Camera?
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2014, 01:01:53 PM »
oh and 1 tip - if you have autofocus - turn it off when you do close up shots and manual focus - you get exactly what you want in focus them not what the camera thinks you want and it stops it 'hunting' to focus - if your camera does it - set it to live view and focus using that, you will get sharper pictures of small objects that way

FaithB

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Re: What Camera?
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2014, 04:47:32 PM »
I'm using a Fuji Finepix 18 x optical zoom -  it has a very good macro feature and I m happy with it.

jille

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Re: What Camera?
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2014, 05:49:08 PM »
I was told by the bloke in Jessops that Canon powershot point and shoot cameras were good for close ups, i also have a Lumix Panasonic which is better me thinks

flamingbeads

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Re: What Camera?
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2014, 06:09:33 PM »
I've always had and loved Canon. I've had various versions of the Ixus and my new one is a touch screen...not mastered that yet and now can't as I still can't locate my charger and battery from the tidy up before Christmas  :o  ::)

kymbi

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Re: What Camera?
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2014, 08:08:14 PM »
I've got a Panasonic Lumix FZ48 which I've had about a year and I love it.  I've not got around to finding about all the knobs and twiddles and more often than not I use autofocus, but the macro has been good for photos of jewellery and beads.  A photography friend recommended it to me as a good bridge camera as it has a Leica lens (apparently...).
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Tinker

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Re: What Camera?
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2014, 10:17:03 PM »
I bought a new camera tail end of 2012 and spent so much time and experimenting to get photos right. Then the o/s on my smartphone got updated and loads of new features appeared for the camera -  turned out to be better than my new camera ::) ::)

Mead Moon

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Re: What Camera?
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2014, 10:00:45 AM »
As a "handbag" camera I used to love my old 35mm Canon Ixus but was very disappointed with the Digital Ixus that I bought as a replacement, the photos are far too soft focus for me.

For jewellery and flower photography I use an Olympus E-620 with a macro lens and am very happy with the quality, although my lighting set-up could do with improvement, but for general photography when I am out and about and can't be bothered to carry multiple lenses, I really love my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ50, which I used to also use for jewellery before getting the macro lens for my Olympus.  I'd definitely buy another Lumix when next getting the urge to upgrade.
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Terri

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Re: What Camera?
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2014, 12:42:52 PM »
I used to be a camera specialist when I worked for Dixons and was often asked for advice of  the best camera for close up work - nail technicians usually.  The amount of times I demonstrated my nasty dry cuticles  :o.

As Tomcat says - it's the lens that counts - a good lens will make a cheap camera body as good as an expensive one.  But that said, there is no need to buy SLR's for taking piccy's of beads.

My advice would be to go to a camera shop (probably only Jessops or Currys on the high streets now unless  you have an independent retailer nearby) and take some beads with you and try them out.  Most of the modern small digital cameras have more than enough pixels and a macro setting, but manual focusing is great if you can get it.  There are ways of using auto focusing as well.  If you can get 'spot' focusing then you can use that 'spot' to focus and just lightly depress the shutter button.  This sets the camera up for the shot - you can then move the camera to change the frame (what's in the frame) a bit if you want as long as you don't move closer or away it will still be in focus.

Another useful tip, especially if you can't get in focus as close up as you would like is to use your editing software to crop the image - which will then effectively zoom in and you bead will fill  the frame.

Back in the day - before digital cameras we used to work on  the theory that  you would take 36 shots to get one you really wanted to use.  I still apply that and take loads of frames, and then fiddle about with them on the pc before deciding what to keep and what to just delete.